(3) Relearning The Computer The Sightless Way

Before reading on, please read Part 1 and Part 2 of the Story of My Life series.
The 11-year-old me continued tinkering with the buttons on the keyboard, depressing the keys only to perceive the stubborn thing instantaneously coming back up, ready to input a new character into the text document on the computer. Despite my friskiness as a child, I was always solemn when the 1 minute typing speed tests on the Talking Typing Teacher culminated, earnest to know whether or not I had managed to up my previous typing speed record by at least a few WPM (Words Per Minute). For many happy days, I was allowed to derive pride and pleasure in simply polishing and ameliorating my typing skills.
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How I Access Android – The Apps & Accessories Pt. 2

Before reading on, please read Part 1 of the How I Access Android series.
In a century where the Smartphone is taking every aspect of our lives by storm, where Android, a mobile OS, has overtaken Windows, a Desktop OS, in terms of Internet usage, where mobile apps amount to a $50 billion market worldwide, it is inevitable that everyone must eventually catch on to this rapid digital transition. Android has the lion’s share when it comes to the Smartphone user base, and the statistical facts that there exist more than 2 billion devices powered by Android and close to 3 million apps for the platform testifies that. But are visually impaired people just able to make basic phone calls, send and receive SMS, and probably use Whatsapp as well on a rudimentary Smartphone, or can they truly partake in this global shift? More specifically, can Google Talkback users utilize the various kinds of smart devices Android fuels, the millions of diverse apps on the Play Store, and the essentials to the cutting-edge of the mobile world?
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How I Access Android – The Fundamentals Pt. 1

People find it immensely startling and utterly groundbreaking to learn that blind people use computers – ‘normal’ mainstream Desktops or laptops with a standard physical keyboard with no Braille on the screen or on any keys whatsoever and apparently pretty similar to what the average non-disabled individual is seen using. However, what they refuse to comprehend is the fact that I do not rely on a Nokia 3350 Symbian device, but a ‘normal’ modern Touch Screen Smartphone –Motorola M in my case.
Continue reading “How I Access Android – The Fundamentals Pt. 1”